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1948 Diamond T

306 Tanker

Offered At

$35,000

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Figure based on a stock vehicle with OH rates with $100/$300k Liability/UM/UIM limits. Rates vary depending on the state, coverage selected and other factors. Policies underwritten by Essentia Insurance Company. Some coverage and discounts not available in all states. Call 877-922-9701 to speak with a representative or apply online. $385 /YEAR insurance
Body Color
Red
Stock
4097
Engine Size
236ci L-Head I6
Transmission Type
4 Speed Manual
Vin
3069469
Miles
21,467
Drivetrain
RWD

1948 Diamond T 306 Tanker

1948 Diamond T 306 Tanker

The Diamond T Motor Car Company was founded in Chicago in 1905 by C. A. Tilt. Reportedly, the company name was created when Tilt's shoe-making father fashioned a logo featuring a big “T” (for Tilt) framed by a diamond, which signified high quality. The company's hood emblem on trucks was a sled dog in harness. From its beginnings manufacturing touring cars, the company later became known for its trucks. By 1967, as a subsidiary of White Motor Company, it was merged with Reo Motor Company to become Diamond Reo Trucks, Inc.

For consignment, a restored and mechanically sound 1948 Diamond T 306 truck in tanker format. Once referred to as the "Cadillac of the truck world", this Art Deco inspired hauler is ready, willing and able to haul whatever liquid goods that need to be delivered.

* Please Note: NO TITLE-SOLD ON A BILL OF SALE ONLY*

Exterior
Drenched in a coating of Shell red, the body with its well minded gaps and straight panels retain all of the original Art Deco charm that Diamond T incorporated into their trucks. Bullet style headlights flank a divided horizontally barred chrome grille with a shiny red bumper below. The big "T" logo sits proudly in its flowing chrome spear leading back to the twin cowled center hinged hood with each side decorated with chrome venting and brass Diamond T plates. Framing the hood are rounded front fenders which flow back into short running boards with ribbed grip lines. A raked back windshield forms the front of the cab giving an almost custom look, but it's exactly the way it left the factory in 1948. On the back we see a fluid tank dressed in full Shell livery. This unit has 3 separate compartments with separate dispensers for different fuels or possibly to haul your homemade Merlot, Sauvignon, Pinot Noir to the local wine tasting. Long yellow wooden tool/storage boxes are running the length of the bed and provide ample room for any necessary hoses and tools. Bringing up the rear is a black steel bumper frame and industrial style round taillights. Red steel 17" wheels with chrome T logo dog dish caps are on the corners with dual tires being on the rear. Breaker Breaker, any smokies ahead? I'm hammer down with a load of high test.

Interior
Extreme utilitarian would best describe the door panels which are gray painted stamped steel with chrome cranks and levers. Moving inside we see a sprawling gray vinyl covered bench seat with a wide tuck and roll pattern stretches from door to door. A slightly cracked 3 spoke black plastic steering wheel sits atop the factory installed gray painted column and fronts the full metal jacket gray painted dash with a central Diamond T logo speedometer being flanked by supporting gauges. Chrome knobs and pulls are throughout the rest of the dash and a heater unit is mounted on the passenger's side down low. Of particular note is the flooring, which is covered with bevel cut oak up to the upward skew of the firewall, all buttoned up and easy to use.

Drivetrain
Lifting either side of the narrowing cowled hood reveals a 236ci flathead inline 6 cylinder. Fuel and air is delivered via a 1bbl carburetor positioned underneath the oil bath air cleaner. Attached to the back is a 4-speed manual transmission which sends power back to a 4.62 geared heavy duty rear axle.

Undercarriage
While too big to traverse our lift we did our best belly crawl and worked our way under this hauler. The flooring, rockers, frame and body hangers are all structurally solid. Drum brakes are seen on both ends as are leaf springs for the suspension. A single exhaust system is in charge of removing spent fossils and all is looking ready to haul.

Drive-Ability
With a twist of the key this big truck fell into a smooth idle and off to the test track I went. I really enjoy driving these old trucks and with my partner in crime crack decoder and all-around good guy in tow I wasn't able to make deliveries to my favorite ladies of Morgantown, PA... but I digress... On the patented and well-hidden Classic Auto Mall test track this drove like, well a truck. Acceleration was very good for a truck of this size, the ride was acceptable, and braking was adequate. All told, it handles like a 1948 Diamond T and all functions were operational at the time of my drive. Eastbound and down!

A well-built truck, worthy of the restoration that has befell it. Retaining almost all of its high-class hauler charm from the skilled pens of the Diamond T engineers and the vision of our talented consignor has crafted this into the head turning hauler seen before you. Guaranteed, you'll be the only one in your neighborhood with one and dare to dream, while hauling fuel may require permits, does a mobile wine truck require the same??? Y'all got your ears on good buddy, come back.